Review: Stay With Me

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Yejide and Akin are a married couple living in Nigeria in the 80s. After 4 years of marriage and no baby, Akin’s family become insistent that something is done. That something is a new wife joining the household, and Yejide feels betrayed and desperate.

Told in alternating chapters through the eyes of each party, Stay With Me is colourful, revealing and devestating. Stay with Me follows the relationship between Yejide and Akin through it’s ups and downs over the years, through love, sacrifice and loss.


Oh my goodness, this book! I can’t give too many details of the plot as I don’t want to give away any spoilers. I will say that the story of the beginning of a family and the eventual shattering and disintegration of the household is both compelling and devestating. The dual nature of the narrative lends sympathy to both characters. It is heartbreaking to watch them make poor decisions and the way those decisions impact the other.

 As a non African, I found the cultural differences around marriage and the expectation of children being actually enforced by the wider family both surprising and educational. While this does happen to a very minor degree here with hints being dropped and questions being asked nothing this impactful would be endured.What a lot of stress for a young couple to go through! Polygamy was also an interesting concept to see explored, particularly when it didn’t seem to be wanted by either Yejide or Akin. I can’t imagine trying to maintain a healthy relationship which contains a third person that you don’t want to be there.

I enjoyed seeing the 80s political climate of Nigeria through this lense as well and seeing how the changes affected the people on the ground.

This story will take you on a raw and emotional journey. Make sure you have the tissues on standby.

4 out of 5 interfering in-laws.

24 in 48 Day 1 Wrap up

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It has been a pretty intense day. Here’s my count as of the now:


Respectable I think. I’m pretty sure at this point I’m not going to hit the full 24 hours, but I should beat the 14 that I made it to last time.

After Dreadnought, I’ve also finished these two books today:


This is such a lovely story, I definitely had some tears at the end. This is also a great book for anyone who isn’t sure why the Aboriginal people are still pissed. The Aboriginal people weren’t considered to be ‘people’ (ie, they had no rights at all and weren’t even included in the census) until the Referendum of 1967. Set in the 1940s, this book intelligently and accessibly talks about a couple of pieces of legislation (including the White Australia Act) that were on foot at that time and their impact on the people. I highly recommend this one.

I’ve just finished this one and I’m very much still in WTF just happened?? mode. I feel like my heart has been ripped out of my chest and stomped on multiple times.

I think I will try to press on a bit further tonight, but I need to find something a bit lighter!

How are you travelling?

Don’t forget tomorrow is also the start of the Diverseathon! It’s a great opportunity to get a couple of extra books squeezed in!